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Domain 4: Violence & Injury Prevention

Violence and injuries kill more people ages 1 to 44 in the US than any other cause1.

Violence and injuries cost more than $406 billion in medical care2.

Beyond their immediate health consequences, injuries and violence have significant impact on the well-being of Americans by contributing to3:

  • Premature Death
  • Disability
  • Poor Mental Health
  • High Medical Costs
  • Lost Productivity

Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries for all children ages 0 to 19. Every day, approximately 8,000 children are treated in US emergency rooms for fall-related injuries. This adds up to almost 2.8 million children each year4. Some falls are preventable; here are some tips from CDC:

  • Play safely. Falls on the playground are a common cause of injury. Check to make sure that the surfaces under playground equipment are safe, soft and well-maintained (such as wood chips or sand, not dirt or grass).
  • Make your home safer. Use home safety devices such as guards on windows that are above ground level, stair gates and guard rails. These devices can help keep a busy, active child from taking a dangerous tumble.
  • Keep sports safe. Make sure your child wears protective gear during sports and recreation. For example, when inline skating, use wrist guards, knee and elbow pads and a helmet.
  • Supervision is key. Supervise young children at all times around fall hazards such as stairs and playground equipment, whether you're at home or out to play.

Each year, one in every three adults age 65 and older falls. Falls can cause moderate to severe injuries such as hip fractures and head traumas, and can increase the risk of early death. Fortunately, falls are a public health problem that is largely preventable5. Older adults can stay independent and reduce their chances of falling6. They can:

  • Exercise regularly. It is important that the exercises focus on increasing leg strength and improving balance, and that they get more challenging over time. Tai Chi programs are especially good.
  • Ask their doctor or pharmacist to review their medicines - both prescription and over-the-counter - to identify medicines that may cause side effects or interactions such as dizziness or drowsiness.
  • Have their eyes checked by an eye doctor at least once a year and update their eyeglasses to maximize their vision. Consider getting a pair with single vision distance lenses for some activities such as walking outside.
  • Make their homes safer by reducing tripping hazards, adding grab bars inside and outside the tub or shower and next to the toilet, adding railings on both sides of stairways and improving the lighting in their homes.

For more information on violence and injury prevention, go to:

Fall Related Hospitalization Rate in Children Under Age 14

Worcester
64 per 100,000
 2015 Goal
57.6 per 100,000
State National
33 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

Why this is important:

Pediatric falls are prioritizing the community health improvement plan as an area where significant prevention can be accomplished through policy change. Because some pediatric falls represent the most preventable type of fall, it is important to the community to pass policies that would significantly decrease deadly falls in children. Reducing falls in children is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.

 

 

 

 

Fall Related Hospitalizations in Adults Age 65 and Over

Worcester
2,512 per 100,000
2015 Goal
2,260 per 100,000 
State National
2,387 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

Why this is important:

As the senior population grows, falls prevention has become a public health priority and the falls rate is used by the US Department of Health and Human Services as a Leading Health Indicator to reflect communities' progress in the area of unintentional injury. Reducing falls is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.

 

 

 

 

 

Assault-Related Emergency Department Visits

Worcester
772.1 per 100,000
State National
377.9 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

Why this is important:

This value represents the number of emergency department visits for assault injuries per 100,000 population. Reducing violence is a priority of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan.

 

 

 

 

 

Violent Crime Rate Per 100,000 Persons

Worcester
988 per 100,000
State National
428 per 100,000 N/A
Source: United States Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States, 2011. Data for years 2008-2011 used for reporting of rates.

Why this is important:

Violent crime rate is a public safety measure as in it is measured by police data. It encompasses fatal, non-fatal and non-hospitalized incidents. Reducing violence is a priority of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan.
 

 

 

 

 

Motor-Vehicle-Related Occupant Hospitalizations

Worcester
44.4 per 100,000
2015 Goal
40 per 100,000 
State National
43.3 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

Why this is important:

This value represents the number of hospital admissions for motor-vehicle-related injuries among motor-vehicle-occupants per 100,000 population. Motor-vehicle-related injury is a leading cause of unintentional injury. Reducing the incidence of motor-vehicle-related injury is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.

 

 

 

 

 

Motor-Vehicle-Related Pedestrian Emergency Department Visits

Worcester
80.8 per 100,000
2015 Goal
72.7 per 100,000 
State National
50.4 per 100,000 N/A
Source:MA Inpatient Hospital Discharge, Observation Stay and Emergency Department Discharge Databases, Center for Health Information and Analysis (CHIA)

Why this is important:

This value represents the number of emergency department visits for motor-vehicle-related injuries among pedestrians per 100,000 population. Pedestrians are 1.5 times more likely than passenger vehicle occupants to be killed in a car crash on each trip7 8. Reducing the incidence of motor-vehicle-related injury is an objective of the Greater Worcester Community Health Improvement Plan supporting Domain 4: Violence and Injury Prevention.

 

 

 

 

 


1NCIPC: Web-Based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS)
2Finkelstein EA, Corso PS, Miller TR, Associates. Incidence and economic burden of injuries in the United States. New York, NY: Oxford
3http://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topicsobjectives2020/overview.aspx?topicid=24
4http://www.cdc.gov/SafeChild/Falls/index.html 
5http://www.cdc.gov/HomeandRecreationalSafety/Falls/index.html
6http://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/Falls/adultfalls.html
7http://www.cdc.gov/Motorvehiclesafety/Pedestrian_safety/index.html
8Beck LF, Dellinger AM, O’Neil ME. Motor vehicle crash injury rates by mode of travel, United States: Using exposure-based methods to quantify differences. American Journal of Epidemiology 2007;166:212–218

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