Skip to content.
HomeE-ServicesCity GovernmentLiving & WorkingDoing Business
You Are Here: Home > City Government > Departments & Divisions > Health & Human Services > Public Health > Data and Statistics > Cancer

Cancer (All Types)

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States, exceeded only by heart disease. In 2010, nearly 575,000 people died of cancer, and more than 1.45 million people had a diagnosis of cancer, according to the United States Cancer Statistics: 1999-2010 Incidence and Mortality Web-based Report.

In Massachusetts, according to MassCHIP data and reports by Massachusetts Department of Public Health, cancer is now the leading cause of death in Massachusetts. The age adjusted rate of cancer death in Worcester was double that of reported heart disease related deaths. In 2011, Worcester mortality rate due to cancer was 198 per 100,000, while the age-adjusted rate of mortality due to heart disease, the second leading cause of death, was 99 per 100,000.

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in Worcester. Smoking is the top cause of lung cancer, quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke will reduce the chances of developing lung cancer.

Age-Adjusted Cancer-Related Emergency Department Visits

Worcester
11.76 per 100,000
State National
16.13 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States and represents a significant burden on the healthcare system. To reduce the risk of death from cancer it is important to get regular screenings. Consult with your doctor to determine the types and frequencies of screenings you should receive.

 

Age-Adjusted Cancer Hospitalization Rate

Worcester
352.8 per 100,000
State National
360.9 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Cancer is a term used for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other tissues. Cancer cells can spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph systems. Cancer is not just one disease, but many diseases. There are more than 100 different types of cancer. Research shows that screening for cervical and colorectal cancers as recommended helps prevent these diseases by finding precancerous lesions so they can be treated before they become cancerous. Screening for cervical, colorectal and breast cancers also helps find these diseases at an early, often highly treatable stage, which can help to minimize hospitalization rates.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention

Age-Adjusted Cancer Mortality Rate

Worcester
198.6 per 100,000
State National
170.3 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Nearly 14 million Americans with a previous cancer diagnosis are living in the United States. People are living longer after a cancer diagnosis because of advances in early detection and treatment. About two out of every three people diagnosed with cancer are expected to live at least five years after diagnosis, but disparities in health care impact survival. Low-income men and women and members of minority groups who have little or no health insurance coverage are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at later stages, when survival times are shorter.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/survivorship/basic_info/index.htm

Age-Adjusted Cancer Incidence Rate

Worcester
470.7 per 100,000
State National
502.8 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Vaccines also help reduce cancer risk. The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine helps prevent most cervical cancers and some vaginal and vulvar cancers and the hepatitis B vaccine can help reduce liver cancer risk. Making cancer screening, information and referral services available and accessible to all Americans can reduce cancer incidence and deaths.

A person's cancer risk can be reduced in other ways by receiving regular medical care, avoiding tobacco, limiting alcohol use, avoiding excessive exposure to ultraviolet rays from the sun and tanning beds, eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a healthy weight and being physically active.
http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention

Cancer: Breast (Female)

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among American women. Having regular mammograms can lower the risk of dying from breast cancer. If you are 50 to 74 years old, be sure to have a screening mammogram every two years. If you are 40 to 49 years old, talk to your doctor about when to start and how often to get a screening mammogram.

Age-Adjusted Breast Cancer Hospitalization Rate

Worcester
21.16 per 100,000
State National
39.62 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Early detection is key to reducing the risk of death from breast cancer. CDC recommends regular mammograms for all women over 50. Talk to your doctor to plan a screening schedule that works for you.

 

Age-Adjusted Breast Cancer Morality Rate

Worcester
21.15 per 100,000
State National
19.06 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the US. Early detection is key to reducing the risk of death from breast cancer. CDC recommends regular mammograms for all women over 50. Talk to your doctor to plan a screening schedule that works for you.

 

Age-Adjusted Breast Cancer Incidence Rate

Worcester
106.21 per 100,000
State National
135.93 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2009

Why this is important:

Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in the US. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive factors, smoking, lack of exercise, excessive alcohol use, being overweight and genetics.

 

Cancer: Lung

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death and the second most common cancer among both men and women in the United States.

The most important thing you can do to lower your lung cancer risk is to quit smoking and avoid secondhand smoke.

Quit smoking resources:

The second leading cause of lung cancer is radon, a naturally occurring gas that comes from rocks and dirt and can get trapped in houses and buildings. Get your home tested for radon.

Age-Adjusted Lung Cancer Hospitalization Rate

Worcester
49.78 per 100,000
State National
46.33 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2011

Why this is important:

Lung cancer is second most common cancer among both men and women in the US. Quitting smoking and avoiding secondhand smoke is the most important thing you can do to lower your risk of lung cancer. Contact the Worcester Division of Public Health for resources to help quit smoking.

 

Age-Adjusted Lung Cancer Mortality Rate

Worcester
58.54 per 100,000
State National
47.17 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2010

Why this is important:

Lung cancer is second most common cancer among both men and women in the US. Screening tests are available that can help doctors identify lung cancer early, when treatments may work better. Talk with your doctor about whether or not you should be screened.

 

Age-Adjusted Lung Cancer Incidence Rate

Worcester
83.68 per 100,000
State National
69.95 per 100,000 N/A
Source: MassCHIP, 2009

Why this is important:

You can reduce your risk of lung cancer by not smoking, avoiding secondhand smoke and getting your home tested for radon. Contact the Worcester Division of Public Health for resources to help quit smoking.

 

City Government
© 2016 | Copyright City of Worcester, MA | All Rights Reserved. | Login | Disclaimer | Site Map